Category Archives: Ancestry

Ancient skeletons found in India

Ancient Keletons IndiaArchaeologists in India say they have unearthed four human skeletons dating back to the oldest civilisation in the subcontinent.
The ancient Harappan civilisation dates back around 4,000 years and was first discovered at Mohenjo Daro in what is now Pakistan in the 1920s.

Centuries-old DNA helps identify specific origins of slave skeletons found in Caribbean

BustamanteA newly developed genetic technique enabled researchers to sequence DNA from the teeth of 300-year-old skeletons, helping to pinpoint where in Africa three slaves had likely lived before being captured.

Scandinavian Team Searches for Indo-European Homeland through Kazakhstan DNA

sturla-ellingvagASTANA – A Scandinavian team has come to Kazakhstan in search of the common homeland of all Indo-European peoples, collecting bone fragments for analysis in the Centre for Geogenetics at the University of Copenhagen.

They Found Richard III. So Now What?

tdy_King_Richard_130204_vembedlarge456The last time Richard III was buried in Leicester, England, he had been taken from a battlefield, slung naked over a horse, stabbed in the buttocks with a dagger and thrown into a shallow grave. That was late August 1485. On Thursday, March 26, 2015, Richard will be buried again. This time will be different.

Questions raised over Queen’s ancestry after DNA test on Richard III’s cousins

tdy_King_Richard_130204_vembedlarge456The bones of the king under the car park have delivered further shocks, 527 years after his death and more than two years after his remains were discovered in Leicester: Richard III was a blue-eyed blond, and the present Queen may not be descended from John of Gaunt and Edward III, the lineage on which the Tudor claim to the throne originated.

DNA yields secrets of human pioneer

Universal ManUniversal human: This reconstruction is of a different modern human from Romania 43,000 years ago. But it gives some clues to what the Siberian man may have looked like. This population was not long out of Africa and genetically midway between Europeans and Asians.

How ancient DNA is rewriting human history

Human skullThere are no written records of the most important developments in our history: the transition from hunting and gathering to farming, the initial colonization of regions outside Africa, and, most crucially, the appearance of modern humans and the vanishing of archaic ones. Our primary information sources about these “pre-historic” events are ancient tools, weapons, bones, and, more recently, DNA. Like an ancient text that has picked up interpolations over the millennia, our genetic history can be difficult to recover from the DNA of people alive today. But with the invention of methods to read DNA taken from ancient bones, we now have access to much older copies of our genetic history, and it’s radically changing how we understand our deep past. What seemed like an episode of Lost turns out to be much more like Game of Thrones: instead of a story of small, isolated groups that colonized distant new territory, human history is a story of ancient populations that migrated and mixed all over the world.

Discovered 2.3 k-yr-old human skeleton throws light on our ancestry

archeologistWashington, Sept 30 (ANI): A new research has revealed about the discovery of a 2,330-year-old human skeleton in the southernmost tip of Africa, throwing some light on human origins.

European Ancestors Hailed from Three Different Groups

european-skullThe modern European gene pool is likely a bit confused now, with international travel spreading people far and wide. However, in the case of native Europeans whose family never left the continent, it has been found that they likely boast a cocktail of genetic information from three distinct “tribes” of ancestors.

The Kennewick Man Finally Freed to Share His Secrets

kennewick manHe’s the most important human skeleton ever found in North America—and here, for the first time, is his story

Genographic Project DNA Results Reveal Details of Puerto Rican History

Puerto RicoLet’s go back 520 years ago to the year 1494 on the island of Vieques, off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico’s mainland.
Tainos, the largest indigenous Caribbean population, were living a life based on the cultivation of root crops and fishing when upon the shores arrived Columbus and his fleet, having crossed the Atlantic Ocean for the second time in as many years. At that point in time everything changed.
What’s written on paper has told us much about what happened next. What’s written in the DNA of today’s Puerto Ricans can tell us some more.

Present-Day Tibetans Inherited Genetic Gifts from Paleolithic-Era Ancestors

TibetanPlateauThe world had been awash in news about how we can see the evidence in our DNA of ancient humans mating with Neanderthals and their close relatives, the Denisovans. Now in a new study out in the journal Nature, a group of researchers has found the strongest evidence to date that this mating mattered.
Modern Tibetans are incredibly well adapted to the harsh environment of the Tibetan plateau. This place is cold, doesn’t have a lot of resources and has about 40% lower levels of oxygen than at sea level. It turns out that a big reason Tibetans do so well compared to everyone else is because of a version of the EPAS1 gene their ancestors got from the now extinct Denisovans. Most every Tibetan who is well adapted to this environment has the Denisovan version of the EPAS1 gene.

Saginaw veteran hopes DNA holds key to World War 2 mystery

Jim CetroneSAGINAW, MI — Saginaw resident Tony Cetrone’s brother went missing in action on an island battlefield in World War II.
He never expected to get a telephone call 70 years later asking if he was the brother of Private Peter Cetrone.

Search For Mona Lisa Continues, DNA Tests Carried Out On Skeletal Remains

Mona LisaResearchers recovered skeletal remains from a centuries-old Florence tomb on Tuesday (April 28) in order to carry out DNA tests that could confirm the identity of the woman whose enigmatic smile Leonardo da Vinci immortalized in the “Mona Lisa”, one of the world’s most famous paintings.
A round hole, just big enough for a person to wriggle through, has given access through the stone church floor to the family crypt of Florentine silk merchant Francesco del Giocondo, whose wife Lisa Gherardini is thought to have sat for the Renaissance master in the early 16th century.

Blood in gourd ‘is not from beheaded Louis XVI’

gourdA sample of blood long thought to belong to French King Louis XVI is probably not authentic, scientists say.
An elaborately decorated gourd was thought to contain a handkerchief that had been dipped in the king’s blood after he was killed by guillotine by French revolutionaries in 1793.